2021 Opening

Well folks, we will be opening for business 5th January 2021. Hopefully it will be a fun diving packed year and full of health and wealth for us all.

So get in touch with us to help plan your dive year whether it be courses, trips, holidays, equipment or servicing.

#ScubaTeks#OneLifeDiveIt#Telford#Shropshire#PADI

We’re Open For Business

As you all know, we are taking our first steps back towards normality by reopening the shop on Tuesday 16th June.
We are looking forward to seeing you all but are taking the safety of our customers and staff very seriously.

We are super excited to be finally re opening for all equipment sales, cylinder and regulator servicing, kit hire, battery changes, trip bookings and drysuit repairs.

Here are some of the things we have implemented in line with the Government’s guidelines to keep us and all of our customers safe:

🐠 Only 2 people will be allowed in the shop at any one time.
Please wait outside or in your car if there is already 2 people in the shop.

🐠 Please limit those that visit the shop to only those who actually need to come in.

🐠As per government advice, please wear a face mask in our small shop.
If you do not have a mask you will be requested to remain outside.

🐠 We have put 2 metre distancing measures in place around the shop and at the desk. Please be ‘distance aware’.

🐠Hand sanitiser is available for your convenience.
Please sanitise your hands on arrival.

🐠Signage in and around the shop to remind you of the social distance recommendations.

🐠 We would prefer contactless card payments where possible.

🐠 When we are filling cylinders we will be wearing latex gloves.

🐠 If you’re waiting for air fills you will be asked to wait outside or in your car until your cylinders are ready for you.

🐠 We will ensure all surfaces are cleaned, disinfected, and washed down as required.

🐠 A mask sanitising station is provided for mask try- on.

🐠 Latex gloves will be provided for trying on any dive gloves.

🐠 Our toilet and kitchen area is now for staff use ONLY!

PLEASE NOTE!

As much as we love seeing you all, following the Government advice we are sadly not able to offer our usual refreshments and much loved chats at the moment. 😔
Please don’t think we are being funny, we are just trying to keep everyone as safe as possible.

Pool and Open Water training-
We have not yet heard anything from the Leisure Centre about a return date as of yet.

There has been various talks about open water quarries reopening. We will get a plan of action together as regards to training as and when we feel it is safe to do so.
Those that had got courses booked before lockdown will be contacted first.
So please bare with us our hands are tied from all angles at the moment.

Don’t forget though!!!
You can continue your scuba diving adventure though the online PADI training system!
Give us a call for more information and advice of what’s on offer.

For any enquiries please feel free to give us a call on 01952 257590
Or email us at scubateks@hotmail.co.uk

Please like and share this post to your fellow divers!

#ScubaTeks #OneLifeDiveIt #Covid19 #Telford #Shrewsbury #WeAreOpening

ScubaTeks BLOG

As a valued member of the dive community and someone that supports us in our quest to promote all things diving, we welcome you to our ScubaTeks BLOG pages. We hope you like the blogs we have posted so far (there’s a lot more in the right hand column), we will try to keep interesting posts coming through the rest of the covid19 lockdown.

If you have any interesting of funny blogs you would like to share, please send us the URL link or if you have an article you have written then send that too.

Most of all please LIKE and SHARE the posts on our Facebook page and help spread some happiness. (It also promotes traffic to our website which also promotes our store) Thank You

Please send blogs through our CONTACT page.

How to Choose the Best Dive Computer for You

A dive computer gives you all the important information you need to dive safely, in real-time. Without one, you’re stuck working with a dive watch, dive tables, and a depth gauge to figure out vital calculations like decompression time, safe diving time, etc.

A dive computer does everything depth gauges and dive tables do in one convenient package, and lets you spend more of your dive having fun rather than racking your brain and trying to do mental math or guess about your safety!

Can you dive without one? Sure. Do you really want to? I don’t think so! Computers allow you to be much more flexible, spontaneous, and just plain safe under the waves.

Dive computer

Here’s how to find your perfect dive computer:

Decide on your budget

Dive computers can cost anywhere from $150 to $1,500+ USD.

Recreational divers probably don’t need to spend more than $500 USD, if that. You can get some really great models for less, and you’ll only need to pay more if you want a technical computer that features air integration.

Typically, serious divers and more experienced folks who want air integration would want to purchase the top-of-the-line computers. An exception might be if you’re a committed newcomer with an ample budget, who wants to start right out with air integration.

More expensive computers have more versatility with gas mixes, algorithms, and navigation settings. The more you spend, the more customizable your computer will be overall. You’ll also pay a premium for air system integration.

Consider air system integration

Some computers are “independent,” which means that they work on their own. They’ll replace a few pieces of your dive equipment (depth gauge, compass, etc.), but they won’t actually connect to your air system. For the majority of recreational divers, they’re all you really need.

Most technical (and more expensive) dive computers are “integrated,” which means that they connect to your regulator and air supply. A computer with air system integration can actually track the air in your tank, and give you dead-on calculations. Most recreational models don’t have air system integration, which keep costs down for your computer and for the rest of your gear.

Understand algorithms

Your computer figures out dive times and no decompression schedules by plugging in data like depth, time, and pressure into an algorithm. Some even have multiple algorithms on the same model! There are lots of different algorithms used, and they each have a bias. They’re all more or less conservative, meaning they’ll take either more and longer stops or fewer and shorter stops. The same is true of their no-fly recommendations and total dive time allowances. When you’re comparing dive computer options, be sure to get a sense of the relative conservatism of each model.

The less experienced you are, the more conservative a computer you want. You never want to take any chances when you’re starting out. Even experienced divers like me often use more conservative algorithms to stay safe.

Your own body is as important a consideration as your experience level. If you’re more susceptible to decompression sickness, you’ll want to stick with conservative algorithms, regardless of experience.

The best dive computers give you a few different algorithm options.

gemma smith dive computer

The Essentials

Backlight: I would never buy anything without a backlight. You might not think you need one, but a backlight is one of those things you really want to have if something goes wrong.

Water-activation: Water-activated dive computers turn on and start calculating as soon as they hit the surface. Since all of us forget to turn things on sometimes, this is one convenience you don’t want to do without. It’s better to pay a bit more and be able to trust your computer to work even when you forget to tell it to!

Alarms: alarms are the feature that guarantee you’ll see urgent alerts when you need to, because even the most attentive diver occasionally forgets to look at their computer. Look for alarms that are adjustable and easy to program. You want to be able to use whatever is going to catch your attention, whether it’s noise or flashing lights.

Basic display features: any good dive computer should show you the basics at a glance. Those are: maximum depth, current depth, dive time, and no-fly/no-stop time.

Choosing between models

Think about where you are now with your experience level and dive habits. What kind of dives are you doing now? Where do you want to be a year from now? Will you be happy with something basic, or do you want lots of room to grow?

Knowing your own preferences is the most surefire way to insure you’ll be happy with the computer you buy. So, try as many as you can while you’re at the rental stage. Go to shops and play around with demo models.

Make sure it’s a good fit for you:

Can you see everything you need to? Does it fit well with your wrist/equipment?

What about the display? Is it set up in a way that makes sense to you? Do you find it easy enough to navigate?

*Do you like to take an extra deep stop? This practice has been shown to have noticeable benefits over the traditional safety stop pattern, so look for deep stop features on newer dive computers. If you want to get super technical, this study breaks down all the reasons to take deep stops in detail.

Article written by Josh Kaplan 

Author Bio

Josh Kaplan is a passionate scuba diver, shipwreck explorer, and world traveller. He’s always exploring new destinations around the world and writing about them for various publications. He also reviews dive gear and writes buying guides for scubalist.pro, a site which aims to connect divers with affordable, high-quality equipment.

Tec 40 – Who, What, Where, When, Why?

Are you a scuba diver looking for a new challenge? Or maybe you’re wanting to explore underwater places deeper than 30 meters or that nobody has ever seen before? Then the PADI Tec 40 course might just be for you. Not only is this course a great place to start your technical diving journey, but you will also have the chance to build on and advance your recreational skills.

Who Should Take the PADI Tec 40 Course?

You may have looked at or heard about technical diving and thought, is this for me? As a Tec Deep Instructor, I would conduct a casual interview over a coffee with anyone who expressed interest in technical diving. It is important to discuss the aspects of the course and the general attitude required to take this kind of challenge on. It takes discipline and commitment to really get stuck into technical diving, as well as an adventurous mind set. Most of all I like divers having a good reason to get started, not just “I want to go deep”. I prefer hearing that someone has a goal that they’re wanting to achieve using the technical diving system.

To start your technical journey with the Tec 40 course, you must first be a PADI Advanced Open Water DiverEnriched Air Diver with at least 10 dives logged using enriched air deeper than 18 meters/60 feet, Deep Diver with at least 10 dives logged at 30 meters/100 feet and you must be at least 18 years of age with a minimum of 30 logged dives. Completing the Tec 40 course will allow you to extend your deep bottom time while exploring wrecks or deep reefs, for longer. The Tec 40 course is also the stepping stone to PADI Tec 45 and PADI Tec 50 courses which extend your depth, capabilities, skills and bottom time even further.

What is the Tec 40 Course?

The PADI Tec 40 course is your first step into technical diving. It is a basic level of decompression diving that will allow you to dive with redundancy of gases, higher mixes of Enriched Air of up to 50%, decompression on EANX 50% for conservatism and up to 10 minutes of decompression. With the Tec 40 certification under your belt, you will certified to make limited decompression dives to 40 meters/130 feet.

Where Should I Take My Diving to the Next Level?

This is one of the coolest things about technical diving – it can be completed almost everywhere! PADI has over 366 TecRec Centres in over 64 different countries, worldwide. This diversity allows you the freedom to pick from the top diving destinations with the most skilled technical instructors, worldwide. Whether you want to dive in search of 40 meter wrecks in Malta or if you want to cruise with hammerhead sharks 40 meters down in Borneo, you will be able to find a PADI TecRec Centre to achieve your goal.

When Should I Become a Tec 40 Diver?

The simple answer – when you’re ready.  This could be when you’re an Advanced Open Water Diver with 40 logged dives or when you’re a Master Scuba Instructor with over 500 logged dives. Despite if you have been diving for 6 months or 10 years, it’s all down to the individual’s skill level and attitude. A quick discussion with a PADI Tec Instructor will help you answer this question.  Our main aim is to keep everyone safe, so we don’t let anyone expose themselves to this level of diving before they’re ready. But when you’re ready, you will know and so will your instructor!

Why Should I Take the Tec 40 Course?

For so many reasons! You will enhance your skills learnt from your experience as a recreational diver, you will learn gas planning, buoyancy control, you will become a problem solving master, and much more. With guidance from your PADI Tec Instructor and the use of the technical syllabus, you will learn a range of extra skills that will take your diving skills from being advanced to expert.

Are you interested in having more time to explore places that others have never seen before? Or maybe you just want to advance your diving skills? Learn more about the PADI Tec 40 course and contact your local PADI Tec Rec Centre today.

Contact

ScubaTeks Ltd

Unit 40
Ketley Business Park
Waterloo Road
Telford
TF1 5JD

EMAIL: scubateks@hotmail.co.uk
TEL: 01952 257590

Connect

Office Hours:

Tues – Fri (10am – 5.30pm)
Saturday (10am – 3.30pm)
Monday & Sunday (Gone Diving)

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